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    Monolith Shows Middle-earth: Shadow Of War's New Combat Moves

    GameInformer
    By GameInformer,

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    With our October cover story on Middle-earth: Shadow of War, we're diving in deep on everything new for Monolith's sequel to Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor. In this exclusive video, we sit down with design director Bob Roberts and principal animator Patrick Watje to talk about the process of bringing new moves for Talion to light. From the concept, to the mocap, to implementation in the game, learn about the most exciting combat moves to master in Middle-earth: Shadow of War.

    Watch the video below with Watje and Roberts to see the new moves in action and learn which martial art was surprisingly influential.

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    Does The Switch Contain A Secret Tribute To Former Nintendo President Satoru Iwata?

    GameInformer
    By GameInformer,

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    A few days ago, we reported on the curious case of Nintendo seemingly including a copy of Golf for the NES built into the Switch's firmware. At the time, it was thought to be a strange test for a NES emulator or some Nintendo designers simply fooling around, but newly emerging details indicate it might just be a tribute to former Nintendo president, the late Satoru Iwata.

    Golf, originally released in 1984 on the Famciom and functioning as a launch title for the NES in America the following year, has popped up in Nintendo's history here and there. Wii Sports, a game whose cultural impact is well known to people alive in the mid-2000s, had a golfing game that used 3D versions of the maps from the NES game as its courses. It is no surprise, considering that Golf was one of Iwata's first sole programming jobs when he started at Nintendo, and likely held a strong place in his heart.

    As ArsTechnica reports, in late July of this year, a poster on a console modding forum called GBATemp posted an oddity they discovered while messing around inside the Switch. The poster, who goes by the handle Setery, said they walked out of the room and returned to find Golf on the Switch's screen. Confused and apparently sleepy, they played it for a bit and walked away, not considering whether they should take video evidence of this anomaly. The post got quietly ignored until recently, when other modders discovered there may have been some truth, accidental or otherwise, to Setery's story.

    Before Setery's anecdote, modders had found the word "flog" in the Switch's code, which is now apparently known as the name of the emulator running Golf. This cast suspicion on Setery's story, as they simply might have pieced together "flog" as "Golf" and created a story from there. Recently, however, another Switch hacker named yellows8 found the emulator and the playable Golf through memory access, but was mostly unable to figure out how to do it otherwise, backing up Setery's original find.

    Thus began a Gold Rush-style search for the way to get to the Switch's hidden golf game. Dozens of GBATemp users were investigating the possible permutations Setery's Switch could have been in to come across this mystery emulator. Was it unplugged? Was there a game in there? Which game? Was it running? Where in the game were you?

    Eventually, someone hit what seemed to be the nail on the head: What were the systems date and time settings?

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    Console hacker Pluto managed to discover this, stating that the system needed to be on the date July 11 and a 1.5 second motion (presumably a golf swing) with the joycon needed to be made to unlock the emulator. It was reasoned that July 11 was the anniversary of Satoru Iwata's death, but the golf swing was curious. The only problem is that this still wasn't working, it was just helping to turn the key a bit more.

    The theory was divisive, partly for its morbidity, and partly because it was not producing any results. Changing the system clock to July 11 accomplished very little, and the proposed golf swing motion wasn't really hitting like they expected. On Tuesday, however, yellows8 updated the hacking Scratchpad Wiki with what he believed to be the real issue, the Switch doesn't care with what you think the time is.

    The very first time Switch owners connect the console to the internet, the Switch basically meets and shakes hands with the internet time. Hidden fundamentally deep in the system, that knowledge of what time it is supposed to be becomes a core part of the console, meaning that it always knows what time it is and cannot be told differently, regardless of what the user-alterable settings say. In order to accomplish something on a certain date, say, July 11, it has to actually be July 11.

    The next thing yellows8 explained was that people had been perceiving the motion wrong all along. While a golf swing, which comes from a neutral position and swings forward toward your TV, made sense, the Switch was seemingly picking it up accidentally as the real motion: Satoru Iwata's "Directly to you" gesture. It was how Iwata communicated the style of the Nintendo Directs and bringing information straight to consumers through live streams and videos.

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    Unfortunately, it does seem like the internet time issue has put a cap on this mystery until the next July 11, and even then it is hard to be sure if the information gleamed so far is accurate. It does provide a small, wistful feeling when you think about how Nintendo designers appreciated and missed Iwata so much that they dedicated a nearly impossible to find easter egg to him in the system's firmware. From a more abstract point of view, one of Iwata's most enduring legacies might be that he is in every Switch, watching over the system's success.

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    Loremaker's Guide to the Galaxy

    RSI
    By RSI,

    Will Weissbaum ventures into Banu space to explore Gliese. This resource-rich system is home to a massive flotilla and a fair amount of mystery around why the Banu refuse to set foot on its most promising planet.

    Remember that you can always explore the Star Citizen Universe yourself in our web-based Ark Star Map.

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    Watch The Brutal New Trailer For Marvel's The Punisher

    GameInformer
    By GameInformer,

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    Frank Castle, a.k.a The Punisher (Jon Bernthal) leaves a trail of bullets, blood, and dead bad guys in the new trailer for Marvel's The Punisher series.

    The trailer for the Netflix-exclusive series kicks off with glimpses of a much happier time in Castle's life. He's teaching his daughter how to play Metallica's "One" on guitar (as you do) and sharing a peaceful moment with his wife, before a masked man in military garb shoots Castle's wife in the head and sends him on a warpath. Cue the expertly edited mix of Metallica's heavy metal guitar riffs and gunshots.

    The rest of the trailer shows off brutal action sequences, lots of gunfights, and very few plot details. We do learn that the death of Castle's family was part of a covert CIA operation and that the leader of said operation wants Castle dead. The trailer also shows some of Castle's potential allies in his fight for vengeance: Daredevil's Karen Page (Deborah Ann Woll) and David Lieberman a.k.a Microchip (Ebon Moss-Bachrach), a tech genius from the comics who has his own reasons for wanting these men dead.

    The Punisher is a brutal, no-holds-barred character and the trailer thankfully captures the moodiness and intensity of the comics. In typical Netflix fashion, the release date is obscured at the end of the trailer, but fans can expect the binge-worthy series to roll out later this year.

    Check out the trailer below and let us know your thoughts.

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    DontNod Entertainment's Vampyr Delayed Into 2018

    GameInformer
    By GameInformer,

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    The upcoming Victorian-era vampire RPG has been pushed into Spring of next year.

    The news comes from a press release sent out by Oskar Guilbert, CEO of DontNod Entertainment. The release explains that a recent technical issue resulted in the team's development schedule being held up. As a result, the developer has delayed the title to ensure there is enough time to polish and balance the game accordingly.

    "Delaying the release of a project you hold dear is always a tough decision," Guilbert writes. "However, we believe that meeting a deadline should never compromise quality."

    Guilbert also expresses his gratitude to the game's publisher and acknowledges the patience fans have already shown.

    "We want to thank our publisher Focus Home Interactive for giving us the means and time necessary to provide players a memorable experience," he writes. "Especially since so many of you are eagerly waiting for it."

    Best known as the developer of Life Is Strange, DontNod has been vocal about the scope of Vampyr, promising a semi-open world which players will be able to have a real impact on through their choices and gameplay. Click here for our recent impressions of the game.

    Vampyr is currently slated for release on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.

     

    Our Take
    Taking the time to make a game run properly is always preferable to releasing an unpolished work. Hopefully DontNod can use this extra time well and make Vampyr the best it can be.

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    Nintendo Issues Copyright Strikes Against Super Mario 64 Online Fangame

    GameInformer
    By GameInformer,

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    Conventional wisdom used to be that Nintendo would allow most fangames to live as long as the creator wasn't charging money for them, but conventional wisdom sometimes changes. When we reported on Super Mario 64 Online last week, no one really imagined how fast Nintendo would move to take it down.

    As Kotaku reports, the creator of the 24-player online Super Mario 64 sandbox, Kaze Emanuar, has been on the wrong end of Nintendo's copyright strikes since releasing his rom for free. Nintendo has taken down the video for a copyright claim on the music, variations of the footage with no music for apparent copyright claims on the music, and targeted Emanuar's patreon.

    This follows in a long string of events wherein Nintendo has gotten aggressive about fangames using their intellectual property, such as Pokemon Uranium, Another Metroid 2 Remake (AM2R), and 562 other fangames in a wave of DMCA strikes over a short period of time. This contrasts with Nintendo's previous image of a seemingly live-and-let-live attitude where fangames that weren't profiting from the IP were left alone, at least litigiously. Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime, in an interview with Waypoint, made the designation of paid versus free the deciding factor in taking down fangames, though he used the argument to erroneously state AM2R was a commercial product.

    The existence of Patreon obviously muddies the waters on whether a project is for profit or not, but fangames with Patreons are not the only ones being taken down.

    As for Super Mario 64 online, Emanuar believes Nintendo is getting combative due to the impending release of Super Mario Odyssey, and says he hopes to resume project development and releases after Odyssey is out.

    [Source: Kotaku]

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